Is Bruce Pascoe an Aboriginal man?

 

Is Bruce Pascoe really Aboriginal, or is he a white man?

Pascoe makes constant references to the fact that he is an Aboriginal man. It has become his claim to fame, and he perpetuates the story, as he needs people to believe that he is Aboriginal. A large part of this recognition is essential for him to support his theories in Dark Emu, a book which claims Aborigines were not only hunter gatherers, but were also agriculturalists and aquaculturalists.  A group of like minded people have studied Dark Emu, and the sources that Pascoe quotes as references for his information. We have found that those sources either can’t be found, or if found, don’t match Pascoe’s claims. He blatantly lies, uses misleading words and terminology to give a different impression, or cherry picks the parts he wants, and leaves out the wording that disprove his theories. This book, is now part of the school curriculum. Even more worrying is the fact that a new version “Young Dark Emu” has been published, to target younger and more innocent school children.

Given that Pascoe has publicly stated that when it comes to lies, he is shameless, and given that he contradicts himself frequently, on just where his Aboriginal bloodlines come from, the thought occurred to us that maybe he would also lie about his ancestry.  Amateur historians and genealogists within the group researched his family tree, and this is the result of our research. I have to emphasize here, that we don’t know whether Bruce has Aboriginal blood or not. Probably nobody knows what our ancestors really got up to in their day. There is always the possibility of rape as well. That cannot be ruled out. Only a DNA test would verify our true heritage for all of us. However, we do know that Bruce constantly changes his story on where his Aboriginal heritage comes from, and has refused to reveal which ancestors this heritage does come from. Why is he shy about his bloodlines, when he is so voluble about having Aboriginal heritage? Anyway, this is our paper trail. With genealogy, it is quite easy to follow the wrong paper trail, so we don’t claim to be 100% accurate, but we have researched the extended families of each ancestor listed as well, and we are confident that we have nailed it.

This then, is the complete list of Bruce Pascoe’s ancestors, as far as we can determine, and where they came from. Once we come to the ancestor from England, we no longer follow that line as we have exhausted the possibility of Aboriginal heritage there.

Bruce Pascoe. Born 11 October, 1947, Richmond Victoria.

PARENTS

Alfred Francis Pascoe 1916 – 1989. Victoria

Una Gloria Cowland Smith 1919 – 2004. Victoria

GRANDPARENTS

Joseph Harold Pascoe 1891 – 1933. Victoria

Claudina Alice Palmer 1883 – 1967. Victoria

John Smith 1864 – 1952. Leicestershire, England

Cecil Gertrude Cowland 1875 – 1963. Victoria

GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

Francis Pascoe 1859 – 1935. Victoria

Elizabeth Jane Hall 1868 – 1952. Victoria

Alfred William Palmer 1870 – 1938. Tasmania

Rebecca Arnold 1870 – 1944. Tasmania

William Unwin Cowland 1824 – 1900. Essex, England

Sarah Matthews 1847 – 1879. Staffordshire / Worcester, England

GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

Francis Pascoe 1814 – 1864. Cornwall, England

Jane Hampton 1827 – 1875. Cornwall, England

John Hall 1832 – 1881. Northumberland, England

Elizabeth Law b. abt. 1841 Durham, England

Thomas Edward Palmer 1830 – 1906. Devon, England

*Alice Berry 1837 – 1861. Tasmania

William Arnold 1834 – 1914.  Dorset, England

*Emily Maria Berry 1846 – 1919 Tasmania

GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

Joseph Berry 1811 – 1880. Lancashire, England

Sarah Wright 1819 – 1875. Suffolk, England

*Alice Berry and Emily Maria Berry are sisters – hence the same parents.

So where does the Aboriginal blood come from?

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

Some of Pascoe’s claims about being Aboriginal.

“And part of my family, the white side of my Pascoe family, come from Lockhart river.” https://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/author-talk-bruce-pascoe

Bruce says “I am in fact Aboriginal.”  https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/indigenous-author-challenges-australians-on-our-fraudulent-history-20190805-p52dvx.html

“I’m not very black. I’m sure that in years to come the Aboriginal community will be under pressure from bureaucracies to exclude people whose heritage is from a great-grandmother who did everything she could to become white, to merge with the master class.”  https://www.theage.com.au/national/time-to-meet-the-aborigines-you-werent-taught-about-20070531-ge50mw.html

My great-grandmother adopted a new identity. …. It was quite common between 1840 and 1920 for young Victorian women to change their identities. To unravel all the changed surnames, muddy histories of marriages, births, deaths and so called adoptions is a confusing paper chase. While that chase led me to the birthplace of my great grandmother and scattered details of her life, it also led me through a history I’d never been taught. https://webarchive.nla.gov.au/awa/20090716060926/http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/60213/20090703-0733/www.fatsil.org.au/14-Paper-Trail-by-Bruce-Pascoe-/VOTL36/Paper-Trail-by-Bruce-Pascoe.html

“And I think, when you start speaking Language, you notice the difference in your own soul, and you notice the difference when you are looking at birds and speaking their name. It does my soul good to go back and talk words that my great-grandmother would have spoken.” Aboriginal Community Leaders Interviews – Transcript

“The really pleasing thing for me like a lot of Aboriginal people, I missed out on my culture and the only way of finding my way back was to write about it because it was the only skill I had.” https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/dec/23/i-consider-myself-lucky-to-learn-about-my-culture-too-many-aboriginal-people-missed-out

“I had to learn my Aboriginal history and I had to learn Aboriginal etiquette by making mistakes.” https://griffithreview.com/articles/andrew-bolts-disappointment

Pascoe acknowledges the “schizophrenic” nature of ­having both Anglo and indigenous ancestry yet choosing one over the other. https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

By the time he was 40, he had fully identified as Koori and was immersing himself in indigenous language and the history of frontier massacres, a subject that sparked ructions in the farming community where he lived. https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

Perpetuating the claim – with a little help from his friends.

“Pascoe, whose great-grandmother was Aboriginal.” https://www.edenmagnet.com.au/story/3914109/bruces-book-of-the-year-success/May 18 2016

“Bruce Pascoe is an indigenous writer whose white-fella heritage links to Cornwall in England, and whose Aboriginal bloodlines span Bunurong, Yuin and Tasmania country, Australia. His is one of the excruciatingly few voices left of the most ancient surviving culture on this planet. The reasons for that are dark and terrible. They are part of a shadow that haunts the Australian culture, and all cultures really, in the same way your own wounds, grief and abuses haunt you – you know… the ones you’re too ashamed to admit.” Verity La October 19, 2016 Lighthouse Yarns.

His friend and ­fellow writer Gregory Day theorises that Pascoe connects with general readers because “he knows what it feels like to be a whitefella — in a sense, Bruce is translating it for whitefellas.”

It’s a positive message that a lot of people want to hear, and Bruce is an Aboriginal man telling it,” says Ian McNiven, professor of indigenous archaeology at Monash University. From The Weekend Australian Magazine  May 25, 2019

SPOTLIGHT ON… Indigenous Australian authors: Bruce Pascoe  https://ausromtoday.com/2013/09/11/spotlight-on-indigenous-australian-authors-bruce-pascoe

“In the broader indigenous community, Pascoe’s acceptance is now so established that he is ­routinely bestowed the honorific “uncle”, and he was anointed Person of the Year at the 2018 Dreamtime Awards.” Ref: Thu, 01 Aug 2019 21:22:25 ‘Connecting to Sea Country’

…he was summoned to a meeting with.. a Yuin elder, arriving to find himself at a cultural ceremony…the beginning of his ­complete acculturation into indigenous lore, although Pascoe again declines to elaborate. “This is an honour but not something we talk about, nor do we point to the marks,” he says, adding that he prefers not to use the term “initiated” because of its capacity to be overdramatised. “I don’t call myself an elder,” he says, “just older.”

“Bruce Pascoe (born 1947) is an Indigenous Australian writer, of mixed Bunurong, Yuin, and Aboriginal Tasmanian (Palawa) heritage.”  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Pascoe

The third conversation of the day with esteemed elder Bruce Pascoe, …. Connecting Sea to Country – Episode 3 Conversations in the Littoral –  I love writing and I love telling stories. There are different ways to tell stories and I don’t feel any of them are forbidden to me. Our old people were storytellers. The more I become immersed in my culture I’ve realised that in Aboriginal life, storytellers are revered. A community wants a spiritual person, a practical person, a nurturing person. They also want a storytelling person. My role in Aboriginal life has sanction. I’m continuously being asked by my own people to tell this or that story, or not to tell that story. Fellow writers think that’s terrible, but it’s not like that in Aboriginal ways or story; it’s something you can treasure. That story is within, you find a way to tell it in another way.” https://byronwritersfestival.com/blog/shifting-paradigms-bruce-pascoe-and-hidden-history

“Bruce Pascoe is an Indigenous writer from the Bunurong clan”

“Many of Pascoe’s books are written in English but awash with Indigenous language words”

VICTIMHOOD

Pascoe also likes to reinforce the idea that he too suffered because of his Aboriginal heritage, and that his family hid their heritage because of shame. He is a victim. Or so he claims.

“My family, I hid their identity.  In order to find some branches of our family, I had to go and talk to people from those language groups”. http://stream-media.loc.gov/webcasts/captions/2015nbf/15_aus_storiesdownunder.txt.

“Bruce said his family denied their own Aboriginality for a long time. When he investigated the “glaring absences” in their family story, he was inevitably drawn into Aboriginal society and culture.” From the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

“My family didn’t know anything about their heritage or if they did know, those that knew weren’t talking about it, … ” https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/eserv/rmit:160504/Kelly.pdf

“I am one of the lost. We weren’t stolen. We hid. You can’t blame anyone. It was a survival impulse. I am surrounded by families who did the same.” https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-25/bruce-pascoe-doesnt-think-much-about-the-1967-referendum/8349860

“Today Pascoe can identify moments in his childhood when the hidden history of his family was briefly illuminated: the taunt of “nigger lips” at primary school.” https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

“Everywhere you look in our family there is the black trace. In every family branch there is the contact, and yet the reflex for most is to remain in hiding.” https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-25/bruce-pascoe-doesnt-think-much-about-the-1967-referendum/8349860

“I had moments of anger, frustration and juvenile rage but the Elders would just shake their head at me and say, ‘no use getting upset son, we’ve got to get even.’ – juvenile rage?, and yet he says it was 1982 (when he was 35 years old!) and ….”I was trying to track down my Aboriginal heritage…” https://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/article/2019/06/23/shocking-lie-bruce-pascoe-opens-about-his-search-pre-colonial-truth   http://www.selectsurnames.com/pascoe2.html

“I was an ignorant Australian when I began looking for Aboriginal family but elders including some from my own family patiently educated me in an Australian history which was at complete odds with what I had learnt at both school and university. It was a shaming experience because it showed how gullible I had been and so ready to dismiss my own people as useless in their defence of their heritage.”  https://ausromtoday.com/2013/09/11/spotlight-on-indigenous-australian-authors-bruce-pascoe

“One lady …… in Mornington, she was Aboriginal, … kept on asking searching questions and because I didn’t know she became a little bit annoyed …. she got a bit shirty with me. And since we’ve begun looking for our family I can understand that now because the family was just shattered, split up, and running from one poverty-stricken situation to another. ….. But in later years, in talking to my father, and even from the time of when I was about 12 my father kept on introducing me to Aboriginal people ….. and as I’ve studied more and more about the family it’s just really telling that so many of the family friends were Aboriginal families and were always in association, living in the streets with Aboriginal people and, which you could account for from living in poverty, but there must have been an element of choice there as well. We’re still searching for family, you know, we’re finding them all over the country.  https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/eserv/rmit:160504/Kelly.pdf 

What? Living in the streets of Mornington, with Aboriginals, because of poverty? But we also have “But in later years, in talking to my father, …” 

Compare that with this “(My dad) only told me one story and I’ve written it word for word in my novel, Earth (Magabala, 2001). It is almost the only thing we know of that past……”    Salt: Selected Essays and Stories.

LYING 

Bruce is quite happy to admit that he doesn’t always stick to the truth. As he wrote – “My first visa application describing myself as a writer had failed, my second, more like my father than me, and lodged in Port Moresby, had proved successful. I am shameless. Most writers are.https://walleahpress.com.au/FR42Pascoe.html

HIS “ABORIGINAL” FAMILY

Bruce makes constant references to his Aboriginal heritage, but he has trouble remembering what he said last time, and contradicts his own story. Sometimes he claims strong Aboriginal heritage, and at other times he claims very little. He also varies as to which side of the family the Aboriginal heritage comes from. Sometimes it is his mother’s side, sometimes his father’s side, and sometimes both.

Here are some of his quotes –

“My family is solidly Cornish, and solidly Aboriginal. Without either of them, I don’t exist. You can’t deny any part of that which produced you. You have to pay respect.” https://byronwritersfestival.com/blog/shifting-paradigms-bruce-pascoe-and-hidden-history/

“(Bruce) admitted that his indigenous ancestry was distant, and he was “more Cornish than Koori”. https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

“(Bruce says that he) has a “complex” racial background, which includes Bunurong (south-central Victoria), Yuin (NSW south coast) and Tasmanian Aboriginal, as well as ancestry from Cornwall in the UK.” https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/feb/18/indigenous-writer-bruce-pascoe-on-why-australias-literary-giants-have-failed

“We had a big day at Smithsonian Institute, Library of Congress.  I said I’m in the land of the blood quantum.  I said you know, because we’ve had this discussion with my kids before.  I said if they bring in blood quantum into our country, you two are going to foul because you know, this is probably the reality of it.  I hope it never does happen.” From the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

“Yeah. I was born on Bunurong country. Lived on Yuin land. But we’ve also got that Tasmanian connection, also a South Australian connection as well. You start following the family line and it spreads out around you.” https://www.dumbofeather.com/conversations/bruce-pascoe-interview 

“Bruce discovered there was an Aboriginal connection in the family, after the death of his father (in 1989)”. Gloria Pascoe (Bruce’s mother), from “Gloria – Light In The Dark”

Pascoe’s claims to Aboriginal heritage on his mother’s side

“Mine is only a remote Aboriginal heritage, going back to my mother’s grandmother.” https://www.theaustralian.com.au 

Mr Pascoe, whose great-grandmother was Aboriginal, … https://www.begadistrictnews.com.au/story/3914369/indigenous-mallacoota-authors-book-a-triumph

“(My) mother’s brother sometimes alluded to their Aboriginal ancestry.” https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

“My family didn’t know anything about their heritage or if they did know, those that knew weren’t talking about it, so it wasn’t until I was 18 or so that I was made aware of it by an uncle. And it wasn’t then until I was about 30 years old that I began investigating the family history. So in during my schooling I was not identified as an Aboriginal person simply because I hadn’t gone to the trouble of finding it out and there wasn’t anyone in my family, apart from old Uncle Alf, who knew anything at all.” https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/eserv/rmit:160504/Kelly.pdf

“I have birth certificates to prove it (his Aboriginality)” (5.30 minutes) https://joy.org.au/theinformer/2019/11/29/bruce-pascoe-and-dark-emu-enter-the-culture-wars

His father’s side

“My father’s are Aboriginal from Tasmania and my mother’s family is said to be Aboriginal but that’s been a difficult search.”  https://ausromtoday.com/2013/09/11/spotlight-on-indigenous-australian-authors-bruce-pascoe  2013

(My dad) only told me one story and I’ve written it word for word in my novel, Earth (Magabala, 2001). It is almost the only thing we know of that pastAfter uncovering the lattice of our Tasmanian days I have a few more questions to ask him. Like, how much did you know, Dad?”  Salt: Selected Essays and Stories

Both sides of the family

“Pascoe says he found indigenous ancestors on both sides of his family, tracing them to Tasmania, to the Bunurong people of Victoria and the Yuin of southern NSW.” “https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

He once stated that his great-grandmother had an Aboriginal name, but declines to elaborate today because the claim has put him in dispute with the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre, which polices claims of Aboriginality in that state.……. https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

“We have family everywhere from Tasmania to Footscray to Maryborough to Lockhart River. My father’s family are Aboriginal from Tasmania and my mother’s family is said to be Aboriginal but that’s been a difficult search. I was an ignorant Australian when I began looking for Aboriginal family but elders including some from my own family patiently educated me in an Australian history which was at complete odds with what I had learnt at both school and university. It was a shaming experience because it showed how gullible I had been and so ready to dismiss my own people as useless in their defence of their heritage.”  https://ausromtoday.com/2013/09/11/spotlight-on-indigenous-australian-authors-bruce-pascoe

My family was told we had an Aboriginal heritage. Some of what the genealogist claimed has been incorrect but our search has uncovered other connections. Those connections are all remote and, for many, don’t amount to enough to claim identity.”  Ref: Jason Cotter 10 Aug 2009 https://www.readings.com.au/interview/bruce-pascoe-0

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

Black, white, or grey?

Bruce gives us the first leads to his ancestry, by referring to his parents, Alf and Una (Gloria) Pascoe. Bruce often mentions his father.

But ever since I was a boy, Aborigines asked me who I was. I always said, “I’m Alf Pascoe’s son.’’ 

He also mentions his father was in the RAAF during WWII.

This is his father’s RAAF record.

Pascoe Alfred Francis RAAF

So Alf was born 2 April 1916, at Williamstown, Victoria.

Alf’s birth certificate.

AF Pascoe Birth

His wife, Una Gloria, is his next of kin.  Alf and Gloria married in 1941.

Alf's marriage

Alf died in 1989.

AF Pascoe death

Una “Gloria” Cowland Smith  was born on 19 February 1919 in North Fitzroy, to John and Cecil Gertrude Smith, and she died in March 2004.

Gloria’s birth registration.

Una Gloria Smith

Una Gloria Smith - Copy

Gloria’s death certificate is not yet available.

Bruce wrote a book about his mother, and she has a Biography on Trove.nla which also shows her immediate family members.

gloriahttps://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37218807

Pascoe Gloria

Gloria’s father was John Smith, and he was born in Leicestershire, England, in 1864, and he died at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria, in 1952.

John Smith’s death notice.

john smith death

John Smith’s headstone, showing where he was born. Leicestershire, England.

John Smith Cemetery

John Smith married “Girtie” Cecil (also sometimes written as Cecilia) Gertrude Cowland in 1904.  Their marriage registration.

Marriage Gertie and John

Cecil “Girtie” was born in 1875 at Pleasant Creek, Victoria, and she died in 1963, in Kew, Victoria.  “Girtie’s) birth registration.

Girtie's birth

Cecil Gertrude’s grave alongside her husband’s – John Smith.

Cecil Gertrude

Girtie’s parents were Sarah Matthews and the celebrated builder, William Unwin Cowland.

Sarah Matthews was born in Staffordshire / Worcester, in England, in 1847 and died in Victoria in 1879. She came to Australia on the ship Burlington, arriving in Fremantle, WA, on 8 April, 1863.

Sarah’s birth record

Sarah Matthews - England, Select Birth and Christenings 1538-1975

Sarah Matthews’ marriage to William Unwin Cowland

Sarah Matthews wedding

Sarah Cowland’s death registration. With atrocious spelling.

Sarah Cowland death

Hubby William was born in Prittlewell, Essex, England, in 1824 and died in Glenorchy, Stawell, Victoria in 1900. William had a stroke, resulting in paralysis.

Cowland wm

Cowland buried

Cowland death

A photograph of William Unwin Cowland, from the collection of the Clunes Museum, 36 Fraser Street, Clunes, Victoria.

VictorianCollections-medium

William was a bricklayer, and he built the Ballarat Town Hall, the Clunes Town Hall, and various other buildings. He also built the Glenorchy Weir.  He became the President of Stawell. He was born in 1825, in Essex, England, and died in 1900, and was buried in Glenorchy.  William had three wives, and 11 children.

Death – William Unwin Cowland

WU Cowland death

Photos of Bruce Pascoe and his great-grandfather, William Unwin Cowland. Bruce definitely has William’s genes. Tidy Bruce up a bit, and he’s a dead ringer.

bruce and william 2

“Today Pascoe can identify moments in his childhood when the hidden history of his family was briefly illuminated: the taunt of “nigger lips” at primary school.”  

I kid you not. Aboriginal people never had distinctive lips. Their lips come in all shapes and sizes, so why lips were chosen to tease him is a mystery. Noses, legs, ankles and brows would have been more logical choices.
However, Bruce does appear to have William Unwin’s nose. What a shame we can’t see William’s lips to see if they too are the same as Bruce’s. Bruce certainly didn’t inherit his teeth from any Aboriginal genes. No lovely big strong pearly whites there.

r0_0_3620_2413_w1200_h678_fmax

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

So this is Bruce Pascoe’s family tree on his mum’s side, and where each person was born.

Una Gloria Cowland Smith (Victoria) – Mother

John Smith (Leicestershire, England) – Grandfather

Cecil (Cecilia) Gertrude Cowland (Victoria) – Grandmother

William Unwin Cowland (Essex, England) – Great-Grandfather

Sarah Matthews  (Staffordshire, England) – Great-Grandmother

So there is no obvious Aboriginal blood in this line, and yet, Pascoe says  – “Mine is only a remote Aboriginal heritage,  going back to my mother’s grandmother.”  https://www.theaustralian.com.au .  How can this be? Unless we are mistaken, his mother’s grandmother was Sarah Matthews, from Staffordshire in the UK.

“I’m not very black. I’m sure that in years to come the Aboriginal community will be under pressure from bureaucracies to exclude people whose heritage is from a great-grandmother who did everything she could to become white, to merge with the master class.”  https://www.theage.com.au/national/time-to-meet-the-aborigines-you-werent-taught-about-20070531-ge50mw.html.  Bruce hasn’t actually said that this great-grandmother was his great-grandmother in this statement, but he has certainly implied it. If this lady was not his great-grandmother, he has also assumed that she would do whatever she could to “become” white. To merge with the “master class”.  It seems very presumptuous for him to assume to know this. To not give her enough credit to have been happy in her own skin.

“And I think, when you start speaking Language, you notice the difference in your own soul, and you notice the difference when you are looking at birds and speaking their name. It does my soul good to go back and talk words that my great-grandmother would have spoken.” Aboriginal Community Leaders Interviews – Transcript.  There is no implying in this statement. Bruce has clearly said “my great-grandmother”. This Aboriginal great-grandmother cannot be Sarah Cowland, as she is English. It must be another great-grandmother.

“Pascoe, whose great-grandmother was Aboriginal.” https://www.edenmagnet.com.au/story/3914109/bruces-book-of-the-year-success/May 18 2016

Bruce also said “…. My mother’s family is said to be Aboriginal but that’s been a difficult search”  https://ausromtoday.com/2013/09/11/spotlight-on-indigenous-australian-authors-bruce-pascoe

He also says “His mother’s brother sometimes alluded to their Aboriginal ancestry.”  https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f   His mother’s brother was Vincent Cowland Smith. Vincent was 6 years older than Gloria, and it is hard to believe that neither Gloria, nor brother Vincent didn’t know their father was English. Given that their grandfather was a well known figure, and his children were all given Cowland as a name, it is also highly unlikely that the siblings didn’t know that he too, was English. As was his wife.

My family didn’t know anything about their heritage or if they did know, those that knew weren’t talking about it, so it wasn’t until I was 18 or so that I was made aware of it by an uncle. And it wasn’t then until I was about 30 years old that I began investigating the family history. So in during my schooling I was not identified as an Aboriginal person simply because I hadn’t gone to the trouble of finding it out and there wasn’t anyone in my family, apart from old Uncle Alf, who knew anything at all.” https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/eserv/rmit:160504/Kelly.pdf  The problem with this statement, is that Bruce does not appear to have had an Uncle Alf. Or even a Great Uncle Alf. If he existed, we can’t find him.

Pascoe says he found indigenous ancestors on both sides of his family, tracing them to Tasmania, to the Bunurong people of Victoria and the Yuin of southern NSW. https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f

Bruce also says – “and found that both my mother’s and father’s families had an Aboriginal connection. I was amazed to find that the families knew each other in Tasmania years before my father met my mother at a Melbourne Baptist church.” http://docplayer.net/99891518-Praise-for-griffith-review.html  We can’t find any evidence that Bruce’s mother’s family ever lived in Tasmania. Some of his father’s family were there though. They were farmers in the early days. They were possibly responsible for displacing Aboriginal people from their land.

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

On Bruce’s dad’s side, his grandfather was Joseph Harold Pascoe, born in 1891 at Ballarat and died in 1933 in Prahran in Victoria. Joseph’s wife was Claudina (Claudia) Alice Palmer. They wed in 1915. Claudina died in 1967.

Birth registration for Joseph Harold Pascoe.

Birth Joseph Harold Pascoe

Death notice for Joseph Harold Pascoe, showing Claudia as his wife, and his mother’s address as White Street. (It should read “Francis AND Elizabeth Pascoe”.) It also mentions Faith (Aunty Faith), who Bruce says was a great story teller.

Joseph H Pascoe death

Joseph H Pascoe

The cause of Joseph Harold Pascoe’s death, at only 41 years of age.

jhp transfusion

Grave and headstone for Joseph Harold Pascoe and his wife Claudia.

Claudina

Death certificate for Joseph Harold Pascoe

JH Pascoe death

Birth registration for Claudina Alice Palmer

Claudina's birth

Claudina (Claudia) Pascoe’s death certificate

Claudina birth

Claudina’s father was Alfred William Palmer, and he was born in Forth, Tasmania in 1858. He died in Kew in 1938.

Alfred William Palmer’s birth. Right down at the bottom of the page.

Alf Palmer birth

Burial notice for Alfred William Palmer.

aw palmer funeral

Alfred William Palmer’s wife was Rebecca Arnold, and she was also born in Forth, Tasmania, in 1870 and died in 1944 in Footscray Melbourne. Rebecca’s birth registration.

Rebecca Arnold's birth

Death notice for Rebecca (Arnold) Palmer.

Rebecca

Alfred William Palmer’s father was Thomas Edward Palmer, born in Devon, England in 1830 and died in 1906 in Richmond Victoria.

TE Palmer

Thomas Edward Palmer’s wife Alice Berry, was born in Launceston, Tasmania in 1837 and died in 1861 after giving birth.  Alice’s Baptism record. Second from the bottom.Alice Berry birth

Rebecca’s father was William Arnold, born in Winterborne, Kingston, Dorset, England, on 9 Nov 1834 and died in Footscray, Melbourne in 1915. He left Dorset in 1855, on board the “America”.  Several family members, including his parents (John and Phoebe Arnold), followed him and settled in Victoria.

The record of William’s birth. Wm Arnold

William’s wife was Emily Maria Berry. She was born in 1846 at Port Sorell, Tasmania, and died in 1919 at Footscray.   Her birth registration.

Emily Maria

The marriage of William Arnold and Emily Maria Berry. Emily’s name has written as Emelia Morriah Berry, possibly because of their different accents, but it is duly witnessed by her brother William James Berry, and her sister, Jane Berry, so we know it is her.

Emily & William's marriage

Death notice for Emily Maria Arnold (Berry). Note her son-in-law – Mr A.W. Palmer  (Alfred William Palmer) gets a mention.

Emily Arnold

Both Emily Maria Berry and Alice Berry had the same parents. These were Joseph Berry and Sarah Wright.

Joseph Berry was possibly born 3 June 1811.  He came from Ramsbury, Wiltshire, England, and died in 1880. He sailed to Tasmania on the ship “Forth”, arriving in 1832. His future wife, Sarah Wright, was also on board with her parents, John and Alice Wright, and her 5 siblings.

Joseph Berry’s death record.

Joseph Berry's death

Sarah Wright’s birth.

Sarah eldest

Wright-27377 A very grainy photograph of Sarah Berry, nee Wright. 1819 – 1875. Bruce Pascoe’s Great-Great-Great-Grandmother.

Joseph Berry And her husband. Joseph Berry. 1811 – 1880. Bruce’s Great-Great-Great-Grandfather

The marriage of Joseph Berry and Sarah Wright.

Joseph & Sarah's wedding - Copy

Sarah’s death notice

Sarah's death

A bit of excitement for Joseph and Sarah Berry, when a tree fell on their house. It mentions a couple of their children. Berry tree

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

This is the family tree on his dad’s side, so far, and where each person was born.

Alfred Francis Pascoe 1916-1988. (Victoria) – Father

Joseph Harold Pascoe 1891-1933. (Victoria) – Grandfather

Claudina Alice Palmer 1883-1967. (Victoria) – Grandmother

Alfred William Palmer 1870-1938. (Tasmania) – Great-Grandfather

Rebecca Arnold 1870-1944. (Tasmania) – Great-Grandmother

Thomas Edward Palmer 1830-1906. (Devon, England) – Great-Great-Grandfather

Alice Berry 1837-1861. (Tasmania) –  Great-Great-Grandmother

William Arnold 1834-1914. (Dorset, England)  – Great-Great-Grandfather

Emily Maria Berry 1846 – 1919 (Tasmania) -Great-Great-Grandmother

Joseph Berry 1811-1880. (Lancashire, England) – Great-Great-Great-Grandfather

Sarah Wright 1819-1875. (Suffolk, England) – Great-Great-Great-Grandmother

Pascoe once stated that his great-grandmother had an Aboriginal name, but declines to elaborate today because the claim has put him in dispute with the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre, which polices claims of Aboriginality in that state.……. https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f  This Tasmanian great-grandmother is a mystery. Rebecca Arnold is the only great-grandmother born in Tasmania, but her father was from Devon and her mother had English parents, so it cannot be her.

“I’m not very black. I’m sure that in years to come the Aboriginal community will be under pressure from bureaucracies to exclude people whose heritage is from a great-grandmother who did everything she could to become white, to merge with the master class.”  https://www.theage.com.au/national/time-to-meet-the-aborigines-you-werent-taught-about-20070531-ge50mw.html  Here is another mystery. Which great-grandmother might this lady be? It’s not Sarah Cowland, and it’s not Rebecca Arnold either. Both are of English stock, not Aboriginal.

“And I think, when you start speaking Language, you notice the difference in your own soul, and you notice the difference when you are looking at birds and speaking their name. It does my soul good to go back and talk words that my great-grandmother would have spoken.” Aboriginal Community Leaders Interviews – Transcript.   This Aboriginal language speaking lady isn’t Sarah Cowland or Rebecca Arnold.

“Pascoe, whose great-grandmother was Aboriginal.” https://www.edenmagnet.com.au/story/3914109/bruces-book-of-the-year-success/May 18 2016

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

Now, back to Pascoe’s Paternal side of his family tree. Bruce’s great-grandfather, Francis Pascoe (Jnr), was born in 1859, in Maryborough, Victoria, and died in 1935.

Birth registration for Francis Pascoe

Francis birth 1859

F Pascoe birthDeath notice for Francis Pascoe

Francis Pascoe

Francis death

Francis married Elizabeth Jane Hall, who was born in Victoria in 1868, and died in 1952.

Elizabeth Jane’s birth registration.

Eliz law birth

EJ Hall birth

Elizabeth Jane Pascoe’s death notice.

ej pascoe

Death certificate – Elizabeth Jane Pascoe

Elizabeth jane

Elizabeth Jane Pascoe’s (nee Hall) parents were John Hall, and Elizabeth Law, or Laws. The spelling varies. John was born in 1832 in Tynemouth, Northumberland, England.   John’s Christening record in 1836.

John Hall

Elizabeth Law was born in about 1841 in Durham, England.

Elizabeth Laws

John and Elizabeth married in Victoria .

Marriage Elizabeth Laws

 

John Hall’s death registration.  Death = John Hall

Bruce’s Great Great Grandparents. Francis Pascoe (Snr) was born in 1829 in Crowan, Cornwall, England, and died in a mine accident in Maryborough, Victoria, in 1864, leaving behind a wife and 4 young children – Anne Pascoe (1858), Francis Pascoe (1860), Edward Hampton Pascoe (1861) and John Willey Pascoe (1863).

Mine accident 3

Mine accident 4

Mine accident 5

Pascoe mine accident

Pascoe 1864 2

Death – Francis Pascoe 1864

Francis miner accident

His wife, Jane Hampton, was born in Redruth, Cornwall, England, in 1827, and she died in 1904.  Francis and Jane married in Kooringa, South Australia, 25 May 1857.

Death – Jane Hampton Pascoe

Jane

Jane Pascoe

Francis and Jane emigrated with their parents to South Australia, before moving to Victoria. Francis’ parents were Francis Pascoe and Elizabeth Jenkins, and Jane’s father was Edward Hampton. Her mother, Anne Elizabeth Jenkin, died in Cornwall in 1853.

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

The family tree for these people is as follows –

Francis Pascoe 1860-1935. (Victoria) – Great-Grandfather

Elizabeth Jane Hall 1868-1952. (Victoria) – Great-Grandmother

Francis Pascoe 1814-1864. (Cornwall, UK) – Great-Great-Grandfather

Jane Hampton 1815-1904. (Cornwall, UK) – Great-Great-Grandmother

John Hall 1832-1881 (Northumberland, England) – Great-Great-Grandfather

Elizabeth Law 1841 – ?  (Durham, England) – Great-Great-Grandmother

Francis and Jane Pascoe, Bruce’s Great-Great-Grandparents are his claim to being Cornish. He says “My family is solidly Cornish, and solidly Aboriginal. Without either of them, I don’t exist.”  https://byronwritersfestival.com/blog/shifting-paradigms-bruce-pascoe-and-hidden-history/  He also “admitted that his indigenous ancestry was distant, and he was “more Cornish than Koori”.    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/weekend-australian-magazine/bruce-pascoe-the-man-behind-dark-emu/news-story/231cefabce2f0103de26b6402fef0e3f 

Pascoe also states – “And part of my family, the white side of my Pascoe family, come from Lockhart river.”  https://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/author-talk-bruce-pascoe  Unfortunately, we can’t find any trace of the white side of the Pascoe family in Queensland. We couldn’t find any trace of the black side either though. There are lots of Pascoes in the Lockhart River area, and in the Pascoe River area, but the only Pascoes we could find in our family tree were in South Australia and Victoria. (The Pascoe River is named for an entirely different Pascoe. A Lieutenant Pascoe, the officer in command of the party of marines who arrived at Somerset on 25th March, 1863, and who returned to England in 1867.)

“I’m not very black. I’m sure that in years to come the Aboriginal community will be under pressure from bureaucracies to exclude people whose heritage is from a great-grandmother who did everything she could to become white, to merge with the master class.”  https://www.theage.com.au/national/time-to-meet-the-aborigines-you-werent-taught-about-20070531-ge50mw.html

“And I think, when you start speaking Language, you notice the difference in your own soul, and you notice the difference when you are looking at birds and speaking their name. It does my soul good to go back and talk words that my great-grandmother would have spoken.” Aboriginal Community Leaders Interviews – Transcript.   This Aboriginal language speaking lady isn’t Sarah Cowland or Rebecca Arnold. Or Elizabeth Jane Pascoe. Who is she??

“Pascoe, whose great-grandmother was Aboriginal.” https://www.edenmagnet.com.au/story/3914109/bruces-book-of-the-year-success/May 18 2016  Really? This quote shows up on several different sites, but I think they might be mistakes. Misquotes.

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

Bruce Pascoe. Born 11 October, 1947, Richmond Victoria.

Ancestors on his father’s side of the family, and where they were born.

FATHER

Alfred Francis Pascoe 1916 – 1989. Victoria

GRANDPARENTS

Joseph Harold Pascoe 1891 – 1933. Victoria

Claudina Alice Palmer 1883 – 1967. Victoria

GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

Francis Pascoe 1859 – 1935. Victoria

Elizabeth Jane Hall 1868 – 1952. Victoria

Alfred William Palmer 1870 – 1938. Tasmania

Rebecca Arnold 1870 – 1944. Tasmania

GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

Francis Pascoe 1814 – 1864. Cornwall, England

Jane Hampton 1827 – 1875. Cornwall, England

John Hall 1832 – 1881. Northumberland, England

Elizabeth Law b. abt. 1841 Durham, England

Thomas Edward Palmer 1830 – 1906. Devon, England

*Alice Berry 1837 – 1861. Tasmania

William Arnold 1834 – 1914.  Dorset, England

*Emily Maria Berry 1846 – 1919 Tasmania

GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

Joseph Berry 1811 – 1880. Lancashire, England

Sarah Wright 1819 – 1875. Suffolk, England

*Alice Berry and Emily Maria Berry are sisters – hence the same parents.

💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

On his mother’s side of the family, and were they were born.

MOTHER

Una Gloria Cowland Smith 1919 – 2004. Victoria

GRANDPARENTS

John Smith 1864 – 1952. Leicestershire, England

Cecil Gertrude Cowland 1875 – 1963. Victoria

GREAT-GRANDPARENTS

William Unwin Cowland 1824 – 1900. Essex, England

Sarah Matthews 1847 – 1879. Staffordshire, England

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

ancestrycert

🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤💛❤️🖤

Another highly recommended site for untrue claims in Pascoe’s book Dark Emu is http://www.dark-emu-exposed.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

37 thoughts on “Is Bruce Pascoe an Aboriginal man?

  1. With your permission may I publish this on Facts Matter Jan?

    On Wed, 23 Oct. 2019, 9:22 pm AUSTRALIAN HISTORY – TRUTH MATTERS, wrote:

    > australianhistory972829073 posted: “How Aboriginal is Bruce Pascoe? Bruce > makes constant references to his Aboriginal heritage, but he has trouble > remembering what he said last time, and contradicts his own story. > Sometimes he claims strong Aboriginal heritage, and at other times he > claims” >

    Like

  2. This man should hang his head in shame, and legitimate Aborigines should rightly be outraged!
    The fact that he has written a book which is used as an educational tool to teach our children is unacceptable.
    This liar needs to be brought to justice.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Don’t be so racist Roy. This is not an aberration, it is a group of people who dislike liars, questioning a white man for pretending to be a black man. A white man who competes against the Aboriginal people, taking prizes and cash awards intended for Indigenous writers. Pascoe has no Tasmanian Aboriginal blood. He also knows that. We have also discovered that he has no Yuin blood either, at least that’s what the Yuin mob have told us. He claims Queensland links too, but we have heard from some of them that they don’t know him either. His paperwork shows him to have completely English heritage, unless one or two of his grannies had flings with Aboriginal men. Who is the disgusting white trash? Pascoe, or the white members of our research team? What about our team members who also have Aboriginal blood, and family? I suppose they are coconuts?

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Go to the website dark emu exposed. There are many very clear explanations of how Pascoe has exagerrated and misrepresented the observations of the early explorers. You can cross check the claims easily, as the early explorers works are all available from Project Gutenberg.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The Dark Emu hypothesis “that Indigenous Australians farmed their land, lived in villages, built houses, harvested cereals and led the kind of sedentary agricultural lives that were meant only to have arrived with Europeans in 1788” is a romantic fantasy which ignores two very basic aspects of Traditional life. Fire wood & foul ground. Traditional Aboriginal women will not travel for more than two hours round trip to collect fire wood – when fallen wood gets short past this point the camp moves. Likewise foul ground. These are the dictates for the seasonal circuit of the traditional estate – not food & not in most cases water supply. Likewise the notion that traditional people would willingly limit themselves to a mono diet of yams or grass seed ‘Jonny cakes for any longer that a few days , when dozens of other vegetable & fauna foods were available in the other 99% of your Estate is a nonsense. Misinterpretation of early journals to produce an impossible counterproductive traditional life scenario has been done before, unfortunately it never leads to a greater understanding of precontact Aboriginal land tenure nor use.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “Once we come to the ancestor from England, we no longer follow that line as we have exhausted the possibility of Aboriginal heritage there.”

    It’s not uncommon for people born in England to be descendants of “returned” Australians, even in the 1800s. To consolidate your research you’ll need to laboriously verify the ancestry of each English ancestor back to basically pre-1788. You never know what Bennelong got up to in England!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. It is my observation that those posting in defence of Pascoe have in most cases NOT READ the fictitious Dark Emu, and therefore, they have not , any knowledge of the many explorers’ diaries whose entries in good faith, were subjected to exaggeration and embellishment , by Pascoe.
    Posting information of a website containing the majority of the authors of these records is a waste of time , as the defenders of Fiction use Utube Videos, and like the fools who have paid mega$$$$ to attend said lectures, they will NEVER accept Pascoe’s challenge > to fact check + Research his claims (from the explorers’ journals).Supposed ACADEMICS , who nominate Pascoe as a friend , and stand ON COUNTRY WITH HIM , and simply viewing fishtrap structures, will attest to the credibility of his claims , failing the basic test of any professional by comparing claims with facts(derived by Research = investigation).
    You can lead a horse to water…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello again Roman. Sadly, you are correct, but we can only try. In our case, one of our colleagues is really good at management, and in getting the media’s attention. Because of him, we have achieved way more than we ever hoped we could. A lot of people have now come out and joined us in their condemnation of Pascoe’s exaggerations and embellishments, and this includes people with Aboriginal heritage. At least we have opened a door a little to exposed what is happening. Regards, Jan.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Interesting to hear Victorian aboriginal linguistics expert Joel Wright speak about how he believes that Settler writers often misinterpreted Indigenous use of fire in that part of the country and the absence of words in the language to describe it. Here is his 38 minute talk

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He used the word ‘Dreaming’ in talking about stories. He has taken on the white mans terms for this as this terminology is directly related to Frances Gillen who was in charge of the Telegraph Station at Alice Springs in the 1890’s. He was the first person on record to use the expression “dream times” as a translation for the complex Arrernte word-concept Ülchurringa (“Alcheringa”; “Altyerrenge” or “Altyerr”), the name of Arrernte people’s system of religious belief.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. WORDS, TERMS & PHRASES…
        As adept as the natives were at pick-pocketing the handkerchiefs of the explorers(leaders), they are today most adept at WORD APPROPRIATION, which is of course, cultural appropriation. Aboriginals (at least the URBAN type) today are manifestly invested in kidnapping words such as >>>MOB, COUNTRY, INVASION, DEADLY, NATION, SOVEREIGN, TREATY, and so on.
        I’d like to know how they got their hands on , and ownership of the word >>>’SERPENT’…a particularly Euro styled & crafted word. I realize that Rainbow Serpent is much more appealing than RAINBOW SNAKE.
        I researched it , albeit fleetingly, and found this:

        WIKI-The serpent, or snake, is one of the oldest and most widespread mythological symbols. The word is derived from Latin(Greek-French) serpens, a crawling animal or snake. Snakes have been associated with some of the oldest rituals known to mankind and represent dual expression of good and evil.

        SERPENT- the creature that tempted Eve

        subtle, sly, or treacherous

        Therefore, it was a term appropriated by or handed to the Aus aborigines , and it has taken on a LIFE & POWER beyond what would have been intended when first used to assist with translation of Aboriginal Superstition.
        Aboriginies were and are(the real ones) highly superstitious and fearful of the AFTER-LIFE spirits. The pretend types use nonsensical theatrical props and notions such as ‘welcome to country’, and ‘cleansing smoke rituals’, and the like, as they parade around in SPOTLIGHT cotton diapers , with accenting colours on dark lotion tanned bodies , bent sticks , and other bent examples of woodwork, to ENTERTAIN , the GULLIBLE , and the fools who subscribe to SUPERSTITION and MAKE BELIEVE , in choreographed performances , intended to demonstrate cultural practices that NEVER EXISTED.
        Aboriginal superstition has no more CREDIBILITY in law, science, logic, religion, or the universe , than FAIRY TALES.
        In relation to their claims of spirituality, where was it written that spousal abuse is a tenet of aboriginal law?
        Why are aboriginal women today so highly represented in cases of maltreatment by their spouses , with no witness to the abuse prepared to intervene. Because of laws???? Then it is time to abandon those laws and
        adopt new laws that protect all in the family unit.
        Australia has to stop this nonsense of black armband responses to the past , stop presenting aboriginal peoples as victims of a cultural clash that occurred over 200 years ago, stop using the nation’s financial resources to finance a failed plan of delivering civilization, via a module of NO RETURNS*.
        Jacinta Price ( Warlpiri / Celtic woman- “what goes on in my own culture, the laws that have existed for thousands of years do not uphold human rights” ) should be elected as AUTHOR of all aboriginal reform, immediately. She knows that changing the date of Australia Day , means nothing.

        So little of what we are being drowned in today re- aboriginal history(Pascoe ) and cultural practice and lifestyle,is factual,real,or capable of resisting logical argument. That means that in a Court of Law, all native nonsense is immediately, non-admissable.
        Time to wake up.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I DIDNT INTEND THE REPLY TO YOU AS A COMMENT

        just SHARING…don’t post that …>>> TY JAN JOEL WRIGHT needs to have a professional intervention to produce a summary of his findings , because 90% of an audience not in physical attendance at a lecture/discussion of his , would just TURN OFF. Thjat has to be the worst presentation of any kind I have ever been forced to ENDURE. I appreciate he has a message , but the hardship of sitting thru his ums n ahhs, is too much to handle.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. TY JAN

      JOEL WRIGHT needs to have a professional intervention to produce a summary of his findings , because 90% of an audience not in physical attendance at a lecture/discussion of his , would just TURN OFF.

      Thjat has to be the worst presentation of any kind I have ever been forced to ENDURE.

      I appreciate he has a message , but the hardship of sitting thru his ums n ahhs, is too much to handle.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Absolutely. I have had a couple of tries to get though it as well, and I have to say, it is painful. Excruciatingly so. It’s best to just listen, without trying to watch it. Somebody needs to tie his hands together next time.

        Like

    3. Thanks for sharing this Steve. Interesting stuff. It’s a shame the presentation and quality are so poor, as it will put a lot of people off trying to listen to it.
      Aboriginal people always used fire to try to burn out their enemies. This happened long before the settlers turn up. Even Captain Cook experienced it. There is plenty of documentation to show that they also used it to warn other tribes of their approach too. It didn’t just apply to the Europeans.
      This comes from an article from 2014. I have edited quite a bit of irrelevant stuff out of it.
      Joel Wright, “The language of fire.” Did Australian Aboriginals burn as we are told?
      Joel Wright, a Gunditjmara Linguist,could find no evidence of wide-scale burning in Aboriginal language and culture, but does find other explanations for the history of aboriginal fires observed by Europeans.
      These were often smoke-signals exchanged between clans, for general communication and warning of approaching Europeans etc.

      Queenie Alexander (YouTube of Pause and Review conference) writes that reduction and ecological burning etc. are based on the assumption that all Aboriginal people undertook fire-stick farming. Joel Wright finds no evidence of wide-scale burning in Aboriginal language and culture, but does find other explanations for the history of aboriginal fires observed by Europeans. These were often smoke-signals exchanged between clans, for general communication and warning of approaching Europeans etc. There was also defensive burning to hinder explorers by burning feed their for their stock. Other fires were to ‘cover their tracks’ when they were being pursued, etc.. Many of these fires were mistaken for landscape burning. Joel also found one record of burning small portions of dry grass around marshes to expose an area to attract birds to scratch for food there, making the birds potential meals for the indigenous hunters. Nowhere did he find anything to justify the destructive and dangerous annual incineration of the landscapes of the Gunditjamara by the Victorian Government. He was concerned that burning the bush as we do now kills the birds and animals so important to vegetation stories, removes scar and burial trees and burns micro particles from axes and spears that holds the clues as to what they were used for.

      Like

  8. So many people jumped the fence with whom ever, Half of colonialist Australia has names written in records that are not their rightful names. This was done to satisfy the good English record keeping and stop tongues wagging.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. I’ve done extensive family research and the more I learn, the more slippery I realise the truth of these matters is. There are many examples where the family stories do not match the records—including some where I can prove the family story is the true version—and several cases where the records must be wrong because they blatantly conflict with other records. And I can’t explain the nearly 10% Iberian Peninsula DNA I have despite having firm records of the relevant generations. So someone has jumped the fence there, but who? A family story is more likely to help clear that up than the birth.death/marriage records.

    To use these records as some kind of unassailable truth is simply naive. People gave the information they wanted recorded at the time for a variety of reasons. And many records were filled out not directly by the people concerned but by some official to whom the strict accuracy was not particularly important (which is why you see so many different spellings of names, for example).
    In the days of early colonialism and mass migration there are many reasons why a person would prefer the record to not be a fully accurate account—and severe, systemic racism is one of those reasons.

    I don’t know Bruce Pascoe, I’ve never met him, and I’m not particularly interested in his family background, but I think you’ve treated him very unfairly here. Surely his Aboriginality claims are a matter for the clans concerned, not for a public kangaroo court.
    It also bewilders me that you would use the fact that his story has shifted in the past as indication of mendacity—you seem to have at least a passing familiarity with genealogical research, which means you must know that every piece of new information changes your understanding of your own family history. If he had offered only one version and stuck to it all the time, whilst supposedly engaged in original document research, that would have been much more suspicious than the fact that his understanding of his ancestors’ lives changes.

    This is a big job you’ve taken on here, and I am curious as to your true motivations. I don’t buy your line that it is all about “truth” because family history is just never that cut and dried and you must know that.
    Whatever your motivation, this whole piece comes across as mean-spirited and disingenuous at best, verging on outright vindictive. I regret reading it, it has left a sour taste in my mouth. Leave the poor man alone and use your skills for something more worthwhile than trying to cut down tall poppies whose ideas you don’t like.

    Like

    1. Hi Kit, It is a shame that you have not fully understood what we have written about Bruce Pascoe’s claimed Aboriginality. If you had understood, you may not have been left with a sour taste in your mouth. Although I can’t help but wonder why this would affect you so. If somebody is behaving fraudulently, and it looks as though he is, why wouldn’t you want that behaviour to cease?

      Using records to show Pascoe’s family tree is not naive as you presume. The records we have published are just part of our extensive research on Pascoe’s family tree. We didn’t just investigate Pascoe’s direct line. We also investigated siblings and extended relatives within the family. We searched for the hidden branches that Pascoe claims to exist, only to discover, and to have it confirmed by a Pascoe family member, that those claims were not true.

      Getting the information correct the first time with research does not cause suspicions. Why would it? If the evidence is solid, it remains solid. You have also made a mistake by assuming that Pascoe was changing his version of what happened as he was “constantly engaged in original document research.” Where did you get that idea from? He decided to be Aboriginal, and came up with an “Aboriginal blood line”. Not just a recognition, but a blood line. His problem was that he apparently kept forgetting where that blood line supposedly came from, and who supposedly told him about it. Which is what piqued our interest in him. Without the lies and contradictions, he would have passed unnoticed by us. It has nothing to do with a Tall Poppy, but everything to do with inconsistent stories. The mendacity that you claim, actually came from Bruce himself.

      We make no claim that Pascoe’s paper trail, which we believe is accurate, shows his precise genealogy. Nobody, not even him, know if this is so. That is where a DNA test is sometimes handy. We got lucky when a Pascoe relative shared the results of his own DNA test. That does not mean Pascoe shares the same ancestors, but it does help to eliminate errors.

      You may have done extensive family research, but you do not understand the subject. As for your Iberian Peninsula DNA, that does not come from recent history. That comes from way back, long before your paper trail began. No family story can solve that, as it goes back too far. There you go Kirsten, there is a genealogy mystery solved for you. Possibly not bad for somebody who has at least a passing familiarity with genealogical research. Lol.

      This wasn’t such a big job. I work slower than most, as I do it for love, and I get side-tracked with the fascinating information I find on the journey. I feel as though I know the people I am researching, and their neighbours as well usually, by the time I have finished my work. I often get very fond of my subjects. As I did with these people. Bruce Pascoe has lovely ancestors. Good, honest, intelligent, ambitious, and hardworking Christians, with a desire to prosper. Anybody would be proud to have these people as their ancestors. Except for Bruce. He despises Christians, and the early settlers. He hates people like his farming Tasmanian ancestors, who stole “his” (ie Aboriginal) people’s land. Oh, the irony.

      Our true motivations are absolutely for truth, and whether you “buy” it or not is totally irrelevant to me, my colleague, and the entire group of researchers I work with. Not one of us cares who chooses not to believe.

      Family history is sometimes totally cut and dried. Not everybody lies, is ignorant, or makes mistakes. Some people are pedantic, articulate and precise. If you are a genealogist, you must know this.

      You Kirsten, may be quite happy for people to pretend they are somebody else in order to profit from that assumed persona. Most people see these impostors as frauds and con-men, and have no sympathy for them at all. They want the impostors exposed. This is the case with Mr Pascoe. He is not a “poor man” at all. Either emotionally, or financially. Many people, and especially those with Aboriginal ancestry, do not like what he is doing. They resent it, and they want him exposed.
      We are helping them to do just that.

      Like

      1. Your racism is what leaves a sour taste in my mouth. In my experience, people like you are motivated by a very deep sense of self-hatred; not being able to deal with that, they project it onto others.

        I strongly advise you to seek help. Work through your issues. You may well find much more beauty and kindness in the world than you expect, once you stop trying to punish strangers for the awful things mummy & daddy said to you.

        Do not contact me again. Your poison is abhorrent.

        Like

      2. It’s a shame Kit doesn’t want to be contacted again. She may have been able to explain how showing a white person to be a white person, by white people, is racist. Kit is also a bit greedy, because she thinks we should be paying FNP rent. $33 billion per year just isn’t enough.

        Like

      3. OH DEAR*…I was engaged in research of DE* , where Pappa Pascoe denigrates explorer GILES ,
        ALLEGING THAT his PREJUDICE squeezed out his RACISM like toothpaste from a tube.
        Where it suits however , he references Giles on 4 other pages, but not favorably, unless of course Giles had to drink water from Rainfall that fell on aboriginal ground.
        Kirsten(beautiful name)…you should not raise the VITRIOL RACE flag…even when losing an argument, or being incapable of seeing through the causes of the agony that Pappa Pascoe has put >>>>YOU<<>>> I
        AM AN ABORIGINAL MAN, OF NO PARTICULAR TRIBAL GROUP”.

        Attacking GOOD PEOPLE ON THIS SITE, WITH YOUR “RACIST SPITTING BEHAVIOURS” sadly shows your over activated emotional state , supporting what requires more than BLIND OBEDIENCE to a false claim.
        Kirsty, dear, you state that “IN YOUR EXPERIENCE”…well, if that is the case, you should seek counselling yourself/ change your associates, and step away from defending the indefensible*…Pappa Bear….He will be eventualy be denounced as a fraud.

        The major reason for denouncing DARK EMU, is because , the real PROFESSIONALS IN ACADEMIA, have not outted , this man , because it is beneath them . But , as DE* FOR SCHOOLS is now endorsed by only the ABC, and those who have NOT READ the explorers’ diaries , then others must expose what is THE GREAT UNTRUTH.

        Now , please withdraw your totally unwarranted and unfair commentary. On this site , you can have your thoughts published here, but on the sites supporting the OLD MAN & THE EMU, we are barred, excluded, because they cannot handle THE TRUTH.
        It is Bruce Pascoe who has whitewashed history, using a pipe clay wash.
        Putting on the diaper and some body paint, and playing native, will not make his lies more palatable.

        Like

  10. #australianhistory972829073

    I wish I had such ” a passing familiarity with genealogical research” as you do.

    The narrow minded response from Kit Kirsten woteva* just demonstrates that those who have not read , have NOT RESEARCHED Pascoe’s claims, have a minimalist(ZERO) KNOWLEDGE of Genealogy,of Explorers’ Journals, or palaentology, to be quoting Iberian Peninsula migration.
    I once wore a sheep skin coat , but that does make me related to a shepherd in the Aegean, nor does it make me want to wear animal skins to the local supermarket , with the words “WE WERE ALL STONE AGE ONCE” , emblazoned on my outer shell.

    Where do these POEPPEL come from?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. As an Aboriginal person and someone who is employed as a researcher in an Aboriginal organisation, the pascoe fiasco brings to light The misinformation That is spread by both Aboriginal and non Aboriginal people alike.
    My job is to confirm my clients Aboriginality and Removal which contrary to belief can be proven (I have Obtained records from Aboriginal Affairs (NSW) on my 2 x great grandparents born in the 1860’s when they were living on a mission) People don’t have an understanding of what Stolen Generations actually means and are quick to use this term when they haven’t conducted research or cannot explain their Aboriginality. To confirm Aboriginality you have to compile your family tree and obtain documentation (this does not include photos) I have not read the book etc however I do believe Aboriginal identity fraud is an issue that should be in the spotlight.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi. I am an professional archivist of 30 years experience (Graduate Diploma in Information Management Archives Administration) UNSW 1990 and a trained historian (Graduate Diploma in Research (History)) UNSW 2013 and have assisted thousands of people in their family history research. I believe that the genealogical research presented here is comprehensive and accurately presented. This research strongly implies that Bruce Pascoe is NOT an Aboriginal person.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. CORRECTION: to response to Kirsten
    Kirsten(beautiful name)…you should not raise the VITRIOL RACE flag…even when losing an argument, or being incapable of seeing through the causes of the agony that Pappa Pascoe has put >>>>YOU<>> through.
    Pappa should present the birth certificates that he claims will give proof of his claims , OR , if he cannot present them …then issue a STATEMENT
    “I AM AN ABORIGINAL MAN, OF NO PARTICULAR TRIBAL GROUP”.

    “I AM ACCEPTED BY MEMBERS OF A LOCAL ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY”…”I want to identify as aboriginal”..

    “BUT, I HAVE NO VALID PROOF OF MY CLAIMS”

    end of insert

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s